[:en]Shikibu’s “Mono no aware” predicts transient beauty[:nl]Shikibu's “Mono no aware” predicts transient beauty[:]

Reading Time: 11 minutes[:en]
The portrait of Shikibu Tsuku was made by Mickey Paulssen. I think he is very beautiful. I hope you too. Let her know and like it! If you want to have one of your family members, friends or yourself portrayed by Mickey,send an email to

During an appointment in the castle gardens Arcen, the clouds and the sunlight falling down now and then played a beautiful game with the budding green. Few people get to see it because there is a lock on the gate at the beginning of March, but also between cold and heat, between the desire for a fire and yakatori, the park is wonderful. Shikibu is cold and folds her summer kimono thoughtfully. She is not now the elegance enjoying elegance among the roses, but rather a thoughtful, inward-looking prayer.

“Mono no aware,” says Shikibu, “is an expression by which we mean Japanese the poignant beauty of things. The inevitable transience of nature makes beauty poignant. Everything that lives and even everything that exists is not eternal! It can be found in Bonsai where often a dead branch forms the essential beauty of the tree. It is certainly also reflected in the way we look at nature and how we experience it. Sakura is only beautiful because she is fleeting and oh so perishable. You must also enjoy it immediately and to the fullest.
I look at Shikibu and try to cheer her up. “It is difficult to stay in the Kasteeltuinen now, but let me prepare some Sake so that your heart is warmed.”
“Ah, the change of the seasons brings tears.” She says with a slight bow to the Sake bowl, I am melancholy, but maybe I’m homesick too. “During the last Holland Koi Show I gave some parts a Japanese name. remember: the Japanese village became Nippon Mura and the aquarium tent Suizokukan, the most often I think of the Doeplein: Ibento Kaijo, where I have to learn a lot more about the Nishikigoi, as well as “Mono no aware” of one expression of the Japanese Art is true then it is for the mortality of the o so beautiful ornamental carps. ”
“Why so sad Shikibu?” I try, I know what she feels, everyone who has seen “Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter … and Spring” by Kim Ki Duk understands. Especially when the young monk climbs the mountain, carrying the noble Bodhisattva, dragging a millstone behind him, recognizing the heaviness of human suffering, and then seeing the light. Many purists of Japan will abhor my free quote from the cultures of the Far East, but my long and regular visits to Hanguk and the conversations with many artists and scientists there convince me that eventually everyone will agree that only in this way “Mono no aware” , will be understood. Shikibu promises me that we will soon listen to Jeongseon Arirang together and of course the performance of Kim Young Im. (see the film at the bottom of this page and the text below the photo,)

Arirang, Arirang, Arariyo,

Arirang Pass is the long road you go.
If you leave and forsake me, my own.
Ere three miles you go, lame you’ll have grown.
Wondrous time, happy time , let us delay;
Till night is over, go not away.
Arirang Mount is my Tear-Falling Hill,
So seeking my love, I cannot stay still.
The brightest of stars stud the sky so blue;
Deep in my bosom burns bitterest rue.
Man’s heart is like water streaming downhill;
Woman’s heart is well water — so deep and still.
Young men’s love is like pine-cones seeming sound,
But when the wind blows, they fall to the ground.
Birds in the morning sing simply to eat;
Birds in the evening sing for love sweet.
When man has attained to the age of a score,
The mind of a woman should be his love.
The trees and the flowers will bloom for aye,
But the glories of youth will soon fade away.

A brief explanation:
Although the Chinese, Korean and Japanese cultures are related to each other, they still distinguish themselves. China is culturally the motherland to which Korea and Japan were indebted for centuries. But because the last two were also in self-chosen isolation for centuries, they always gave their own interpretation of the philosophies imported from the motherland.
The first Chinese text (Wei Chi) about Japan tells about the country Wa (Yamataikoku) and her Queen Pimiko (170-248). She was a Shamanic Queen and was chosen after decades of battle between the Kings of Wa.
Did she really exist? We do not know, but it marks the beginning of the description of religion in Japan. She was engaged in sorcery and magic. She bewitched her subjects. She was not married and her younger brother helped her to rule the country. After she became Queen, hardly anyone saw her anymore.
A thousand women represented her and only one man; he gave her food and drink. As a shaman, Pimiko mediated between her people and the gods, spirits and other supernatural powers that were later identified with Kami. Where in Korea the worship of ancestors and house spirits is still taken very seriously, the Japanese do not forget the Kami. The shaman is often visited in Korea while in Japan the Shinto priests lead the frequently visited cleansing rituals.

The explanation was necessary in order to give some meaning to what Shikibu then told me: “Japanese names, as a first step to feel my little beloved Nihon, the origin of the sun with all its splendour and mysticism, here in Limburg a bit. Mura means unique and yes during the Holland Koi Show a unique Japanese village is formed here, which I now think back to warm my heart and to which I want to know that it will become increasingly unique and more vibrant. A Japanese world event (Ibento) where the koi science is made for everyone (kaijo). The castle gardens as Suizokukan (aquarium) full of Mono no aware.

historical Nara google Japan
historical Nara google Japan

This somewhat annoying winter – in Niigata the snow meters were high while only a shade of white was visible – I thought about these gardens a lot. Philosophied about their location and about which names I could continue.
Shudder about what I have found. When you fly to Geongbokgung palace with google earth, then to Nara and then on to the Saitobaru burial mounds you notice one thing: all these historical places are more or less on the North-

Saitobaru Burial Mounds
Saitobaru Burial Mounds

South line with the centre of gravity of the buildings in the north.
The Feng Sui constellation of Gyongbokgung is clear and from Nara (Heijo-Kyo capital of Japan between (745 and 784) I can tell that it is enclosed between mountains like Amanokagu, Umimashi in the east, Kasagu in the north and Nara in The important water objects are the Ogura lake and the Yodo and Kidu river.

 

Kasteeltuinen Arcen volgens Shikibu

The Castle Gardens Arcen are also located on the North-South Line with the centre of gravity of the buildings in the North. There is a small deviation, but this can probably be explained by the place on earth and the difference between the real and the magnetic North. ”
Shikibu looked at me triumphantly. She was clearly full of her find. “It reassures me that here too the energy comes into contact with water. The mesh is a few hundred meters away. From both the Gyongbokgung Palace in Seoul and the historic Nara, we know that they are protected on three sides by mountains and that they are adjacent to a water basin on the open side.
Where the Kasteeltuin Arcen for me is Kitsu and the rest of the Netherlands and Belgium the basin. Feng Sui diviners have to determine which mountains are of interest. Of course, we have the Ardennes in the South and the Scandinavian mountain ranges in the North. To the west, the Low Countries are protected by the mountain ranges in Germany, Switzerland and beyond. But where the Feng Sui energy really arises; I do not know but for me, it is clear that here on the show grounds prosperity and happiness and that great things will be achieved. ”

During the way back home I felt the melancholy warmth of the Sake in my body. It was quiet on the train and the cold landscape passed as if in a flight. Along the edge of the forest, I saw a deer with her young slowly approaching and then quickly pass by. “Mono no aware”, the poignant beauty of things.
I would like to discover it the next time I am in the Kasteeltuinen together with Shikibu. Maybe we can capture them just like they do in Japan; make it a natural scrap so everyone can enjoy what Shikibu sees.

scientific substantiation:
Department of Architecture, Mukogawa Women’s University, Nishinomiya, Japan:

– Enclosed Spaces of Ancient Japanese Cites and Watersheds: Analysis of Mountain Ranges and Water Systems of Kyoto, Nara, Dazaifu, and Kamakura using a Three-dimensional Terrain Model
– Relationships between Feng-Shui and landscapes of Chagan and Heijo-Kyo
– Enclosed spaces for Seoul and Kaesong on Feng-Shui

 [:nl]

The portrait of Shikibu Tsuku was made by Mickey Paulssen. I think he is very beautiful. I hope you too. Let her know and like it! If you want to have one of your family members, friends or yourself portrayed by Mickey,send an email to

Tijdens een afspraak in de kasteeltuinen Arcen speelden de wolken en het zo nu en dan naar beneden vallende zonlicht een prachtspel met het ontluikend groen. Slechts weinigen krijgen het te zien omdat er zo begin maart nog een slot op de poort zit maar ooktussen kou en warmte, tussen verlangen naar haardvuur en yakatori ligt het park er wondermooi bij. Shikibu heeft het koud en vouwt bedachtzaam haar zomerkimono. Ze is nu niet de tussen de rozen genietende elegantie maar meer een bedachtzame in zichzelf gekeerd gebed.

“Mono no aware”, zegt Shikibu, “is een uitdrukking waarmee wij Japanners de schrijnende schoonheid van dingen bedoelen. De onafwendbare vergankelijkheid van de natuur maakt schoonheid schrijnend. Alles wat leeft en zelfs alles wat bestaat is niet voor eeuwig!  Het is terug te vinden in Bonsai waarbij vaak een dode tak de wezenlijke schoonheid van het boompje vormt. Het is zeer zeker ook terug te vinden in de manier waarop wij naar de natuur kijken en hoe wij deze beleven. Sakura is alleen mooi omdat zij vluchtig is en o zo vergankelijk. Je moet er dan ook meteen en met volle teugen van genieten.
Ik kijk Shikibu aan en probeer haar wat op te beuren. “Het is moeilijk om nu in de Kasteeltuinen te verblijven. Maar laat ik je wat Sake bereiden zodat je hart wordt verwarmd.”
“Ach de verandering van de seizoenen brengt tranen.” Zegt ze met een lichte buiging naar het Sake kommetje. Ik ben weemoedig maar misschien heb ik ook wel heimwee. Tijdens  de laatste Holland Koi Show heb ik sommige onderdelen al een Japanse naam gegeven. Je weet wel: het Japans dorp werd Nippon Mura en de aquariumtent Suizokukan. Het vaakst denk ik aan het Doeplein: Ibento Kaijo. Daar moet ik toch veel meer kunnen leren over de Nishikigoi. Trouwens als “Mono no aware” voor één uiting van de Japanse kunst geldt dan is het wel voor de sterfelijkheid van de o zo mooie sierkarpers.”
“Waarom zo triest Shikibu?”, probeer ik. Ik weet wat ze voelt. Iedereen die “Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter… and Spring ” van Kim Ki Duk heeft gezien begrijpt het ook. Vooral waneer de jonge monnik de berg beklimt, de nobele Bodhisattva dragend, een molensteen achter zich aanslepend, de zwaarte erkennend van het menselijk lijden, om vervolgens het licht te zien. Veel Japan puristen zullen mijn vrijelijk citeren uit de culturen van het verre oosten verafschuwen maar mijn langdurige en regelmatige bezoeken aan Hanguk en de gesprekken met vele kunstenaars en wetenschappers aldaar overtuigen me ervan dat uiteindelijk iedereen zal onderschrijven dat alleen op die manier “Mono no aware”, zal kunnen worden begrepen. Shikibu beloofd me dat we binnenkort samen naar Jeongseon Arirang luisteren en dan natuurlijk de uitvoering van Kim Young Im. (zie film onderaan deze pagina en de tekst bij de foto,)

Arirang, Arirang, Arariyo,

Arirang Pass is the long road you go.
If you leave and forsake me, my own.
Ere three miles you go, lame you’ll have grown.
Wondrous time, happy time , let us delay;
Till night is over, go not away.
Arirang Mount is my Tear-Falling Hill,
So seeking my love, I cannot stay still.
The brightest of stars stud the sky so blue;
Deep in my bosom burns bitterest rue.
Man’s heart is like water streaming downhill;
Woman’s heart is well water — so deep and still.
Young men’s love is like pine-cones seeming sound,
But when the wind blows, they fall to the ground.
Birds in the morning sing simply to eat;
Birds in the evening sing for love sweet.
When man has attained to the age of a score,
The mind of a woman should be his love.
The trees and the flowers will bloom for aye,
But the glories of youth will soon fade away.

 

Een korte toelichting:
Alhoewel de Chinese, de Koreaanse en de Japanse cultuur aan elkaar gerelateerd zijn, onderscheiden ze zich toch. China is cultureel gezien het moederland waaraan Korea en Japan eeuwenlang schatplichtig waren. Maar doordat de laatste twee ook eeuwenlang in een zelfgekozen isolement verkeerden gaven ze aan de vanuit het moederland geïmporteerde filosofiën steeds hun eigen interpretatie.
De eerste Chinese tekst (Wei Chi) over Japan vertelt over het land Wa (Yamataikoku) en haar Koningin Pimiko  (170-248). Zij was een Sjamanistische Koningin en werd gekozen na tientallen jaren strijd tussen de Koningen van Wa.
Heeft ze echt bestaan? We weten het niet maar ze markeert het begin van de beschrijving van religie in Japan. Ze hield zich bezig met tovenarij en magie. Ze behekste haar onderdanen. Ze was niet getrouwd en haar jongere broer hielp haar met het regeren van het land. Nadat ze Koningin was geworden zag bijna niemand haar meer.
Duizend vrouwen vertegenwoordigde haar en slechts een man; hij gaf haar eten en drinken. Als Sjamaan bemiddelde Pimiko tussen haar mensen en de goden, geesten en andere bovennatuurlijke krachten die later met Kami werden aangeduid. Daar waar in Korea de aanbidding van voorouders en huisgeesten nog steeds zeer serieus wordt genomen vergeet de Japanner de Kami niet. De sjamaan wordt in Korea nog vaak bezocht terwijl in Japan de Shinto priesters de vaak bezochte reinigingsrituelen leiden.

Feng sui betekent letterlijk wind en water. In Korea noemen ze het Ponsoo en in Japans Fusui. Het Chinese begrafenisboek Zang Shu zegt: “Qi drijft op feng (wind) en verspreidt maar blijft waar het Shui (water) tegenkomt. Feng Sui wordt gebruikt om de harmonie tussen de natuur, gecreëerde vormen en de mens te bewerkstelligen. Wereld beroemd is de Koreaanse harmonie: de feng sui energie stroom – punsu-jiri in het Koreaans – die door de Hankuk mensen zeer serieus wordt genomen.
De energie ontstaat op de Baekdu berg, via het Baekdu – Deagan bergsysteem waar het het Korea’s centrale Feng sui zenuwstelsel vormt dat zich verspreid over de subsidiaire bergruggen. In Seoul stuit de qi op de Cheonggyecheon beek en vormt Ketsu. Daar waar Ketsu bestaat is het uitstekend bouwen. Daarom werd het Gyongbokgung paleis in Seoul op die plaats gebouwd.

De toelichting was nodig om datgene wat Shikibu me vervolgens vertelde enige duiding te geven: “japanse namen dus, als eerste stap om mijn zo geliefde Nihon, oorsprong van de zon met al haar pracht en mystiek, hier in Limburg een beetje te voelen. Mura betekent uniek en ja tijdens de Holland Koi Show vormt zich hier ook een uniek Japans dorp waaraan ik nu terugdenk om mijn hart te warmen en waarnaar ik verlang wetend dat het steeds unieker en bruisender zal worden. Een japans wereld evenement (Ibento) waar de koiwetenschap voor iedereen gewoon (kaijo) wordt gemaakt. De kasteeltuinen als Suizokukan (aquarium) vol van Mono no aware.

 

historical Nara google Japan
historical Nara google Japan

Deze wat vervelende winter – in Niigata lag de sneeuw meters hoog terwijl hier slechts een aai wit was te zien- heb ik veel over deze tuinen nagedacht. Gefilosofeerd over hun ligging en over welke namen ik verder kon even.
Huiver over wat ik heb gevonden. Wanneer je met google earth naar Geongbokgung palace vliegt, vervolgens naar Nara en dan verder naar de Saitobaru grafheuvels dan valt je een ding op: al deze historische plaatsen liggen meer of minder op de

Saitobaru Burial Mounds
Saitobaru Burial Mounds

Noord- Zuidlijn met het zwaartepunt van de bebouwing in het noorden.
De Feng Sui constellatie van Gyongbokgung is duidelijk en van Nara (Heijo-Kyo- hoofdstad van Japan tussen (745 en 784) kan ik vertellen dat deze ingesloten ligt tussen bergen als Amanokagu, Umimashi in het oosten, Kasagu in het noorden en Nara in het westen. Belangrijke waterobjecten zijn het Ogura meer en de Yodo en Kidu rivier.

 

Kasteeltuinen Arcen volgens Shikibu

Ook de Kasteeltuinen Arcen liggen op die Noord Zuid Lijn met het zwaartepunt van de bebouwing in het Noorden. Er valt een kleine afwijking te bespeuren maar dit valt waarschijnlijk te verklaren met de plaats op aarde en het verschil tussen het échte en het magnetische Noorden.”
Shikibu keek me triomfantelijk aan. Ze was duidelijk vol van haar vondst. “Het stelt me gerust dat ook hier de energie stuit op water. De maas ligt enkele honderden meters verderop. Van zowel het Gyongbokgung paleis in Seoul als het historische Nara weten we dat ze aan drie zijden worden beschermd door bergen en dat ze aan de open zijde grenzen aan een waterbekken.
Daar waar de Kasteeltuin Arcen voor mij Kitsu zijn en de rest van Nederland en België het bekken. moeten Feng Sui wichelaars maar vaststellen welke bergen van belang zijn. Natuurlijk hebben we de Ardennen in het Zuiden en de Scandinavische bergketens in het Noorden. Ten westen worden de Lage landen afgeschermd door de bergketens in Duitsland, Zwitserland en verder. Maar waar de Feng Sui energie écht ontstaat; ik weet het niet maar voor mij is het duidelijk dat hier op het showterrein voorspoed en geluk heerst en dat er nog grote dingen zullen worden bereikt.”

Tijdens de terugweg naar huis voelde ik de weemoedige warmte van de Sake in mijn lichaam. Het was rustig in de trein en het koude landschap trok als in een vlucht voorbij. Langs de bosrand zag ik een hert met haar jong langzaam naderbij komen en vervolgens snel voorbij schieten. “Mono no aware”, de schrijnende schoonheid der dingen.
Graag ontdek ik het de volgende keer dat ik in de Kasteeltuinen ben samen met Shikibu. Misschien kunnen we ze net zoals ze in Japan doen vastleggen; er een natuurschrijntje van maken zodat iedereen kan genieten van datgene wat Shikibu ziet.

wetenschappelijke onderbouwing:

Department of Architecture, Mukogawa Women’s University, Nishinomiya, Japan:

– Enclosed Spaces of Ancient Japanese Cites and Watersheds: Analysis of Mountain Ranges and Water Systems of Kyoto, Nara, Dazaifu, and Kamakura using a Three-dimensional Terrain Model
– Relationships between Feng-Shui and landscapes of Chagan and Heijo-Kyo
– Enclosed spaces for Seoul and Kaesong on Feng-Shui

 [:]

JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER
I agree to have my personal information transfered to MailChimp ( more information )
Join the Mantifang newsletter and we will keep you up to date once a month
We hate spam. Your email address will not be sold or shared with anyone else.

11 thoughts on “[:en]Shikibu’s “Mono no aware” predicts transient beauty[:nl]Shikibu's “Mono no aware” predicts transient beauty[:]

  1. Pingback: WOW Blog